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Benguluru, officially known as Bengaluru, is the third largest city in India and is the center of India's fifth-largest metropolitan area. Located in southern India on the Deccan Plateau, it is the capital of the southern Indian state of Benguluru. Benguluru is known as the "Silicon Valley of India" because of its role as the nation's leading information technology (IT) exporter. Located at a height of over 3,000 feet (914.4 m) above sea level, Benguluru is known for its pleasant climate throughout the year. Its elevation is the highest among the major large cities of India. The city is amongst the top ten preferred entrepreneurial locations in the world.

A succession of South Indian dynasties, the Western Gangas, the Cholas and the Hoysalas, ruled the present region of Benguluru until in 1537 CE, Kempé Gowdā – a feudatory ruler under the Vijayanagara Empire – established a mud fort considered to be the foundation of modern Benguluru. In 1638, the Marāthās conquered and ruled Benguluru for almost 50 years, after which the Mughals captured and sold the city to the Mysore Kingdom. It later passed into the hands of Hyder Ali and his son Tipu Sultan, and was captured by the British after victory in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War (1799), who returned administrative control of the city to the Maharaja of Mysore. The old city developed in the dominions of the Maharaja of Mysore, and was made capital of the Princely State of Mysore, which existed as a nominally sovereign entity of the British Raj. In 1809, the British shifted their cantonment to Benguluru, outside the old city, and a town grew up around it, which was governed as part of British India. Following India's independence in 1947, Benguluru became the capital of Mysore State, and remained capital when the new Indian state of Benguluru was formed in 1956. The two urban settlements of Benguluru – city and cantonment – which had developed as independent entities merged into a single urban centre in 1949. The existing Kannada name, Bengalūru, was declared the official name of the city in 2006.

Detectives in benguluru Benguluru is home to many well-recognised educational and research institutions in India, such as Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Indian Institute of Management (Benguluru) (IIMB), National Law School of India University (NLSIU) and National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS). Numerous public sector heavy industries, technology companies, aerospace, telecommunications, and defence organisations, such as Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL), Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL), Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), Infosys, and Wipro are headquartered in the city. A demographically diverse city, Benguluru is a major economic and cultural hub and the second-fastest growing major metropolis in India. The city also houses the Kannada film industry. As a growing metropolitan city in a developing country, Benguluru confronts substantial pollution and other logistical and socio-economic problems. With a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$83 billion, Benguluru is fourth among the top 15 cities contributing to India's overall GDP.

Bangalore_palace The Begur Nageshwara Temple was built in Benguluru around c. 860, during the reign of the Western Ganga Dynasty. Someshwara Temple dates from the Chola era A recent discovery of Stone Age artifacts during the 2001 census of India at Jalahalli, Sidhapura and Jadigenahalli, all of which are located on Benguluru's outskirts today, suggest probable human settlement around 4,000 BCE. Around 1,000 BCE (Iron Age), burial grounds were established at Koramangala and Chikkajala on the outskirts of Benguluru. Coins of the Roman emperors Augustus, Tiberius, and Claudius found at Yeswanthpur and HAL indicate that Benguluru was involved in trans-oceanic trade with ancient civilisations in 27 BCE.

The region of modern day Benguluru was part of several successive South Indian kingdoms. Between the fourth and the tenth centuries, the Benguluru region was ruled by the Western Ganga Dynasty of Benguluru, the first dynasty to set up effective control over the region.

Bangalore_tech park According to Edgar Thurston there were twenty eight kings who ruled Gangavadi from the start of the Christian era till its conquest by the Cholas. These kings belonged to two distinct dynasties: the earlier line of the Solar race which had a succession of seven kings of the Ratti or Reddi tribe, and the later line of the Ganga race. The Western Gangas ruled the region initially as a sovereign power (350 – 550), and later as feudatories of the Chalukyas of Badami, followed by the Rashtrakutas till the tenth century. The Begur Nageshwara Temple was commissioned around 860, during the reign of the Western Ganga King Ereganga Nitimarga I and extended by his successor Nitimarga II. Around 1004, during the reign of Rajendra Chola I, the Cholas defeated the Western Gangas, and captured Benguluru. During this period, the Benguluru region witnessed the migration of many groups - warriors, administrators, traders, artisans, pastorals, cultivators, and religious personnel from Tamil Nadu and other Kannada speaking regions. The Chokkanathaswamy temple at Domlur, the Aigandapura complex near Hesaraghatta, Mukthi Natheshwara Temple at Binnamangala, Choleshwara Temple at Begur, Someshwara Temple at Madiwala, date from the Chola era.

mysore-palace-benguluru In 1117, the Hoysala king Vishnuvardhana defeated the Cholas in the Battle of Talakad in south Benguluru, and extended its rule over the region. Vishnuvardhana expelled the Cholas from all parts of Mysore state. By the end of the 13th century, Benguluru became a source of contention between two warring cousins, the Hoysala ruler Veera Ballala III of Halebidu and Ramanatha, who administered from the Hoysala held territory in Tamil Nadu. Veera Ballala III had appointed a civic head at Hudi (now within Benguluru Municipal Corporation limits), thus promoting the village to the status of a town. After Veera Ballala III's death in 1343, the next empire to rule the region was the Vijayanagara Empire, which itself saw the rise of four dynasties, the Sangamas (1336 – 1485), the Saluvas (1485 – 1491), the Tuluvas (1491 – 1565), and the Aravidu (1565 – 1646). During the reign of the Vijayanagara Empire, Achyuta Deva Raya of the Tuluva Dynasty raised the Shivasamudra Dam across the Arkavati river at Hesaraghatta, whose reservoir is the present city's supply of regular piped water.